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Could you be a Trustee at Wildside?

Wildside Activity Centre                                              

WildsideWildside is seeking new Board members. This is a fantastic opportunity to be part of a small fast-developing charity in a critically important role. We need Board members who will share our ethos and help us to continue to grow our programmes.

Wildside is a small charity based by the canal less than two miles from Wolverhampton City Centre. All ages, all abilities – we reconnect people with nature. We offer environmental and adventurous activities, creating high quality opportunities for outdoor learning, health and wellbeing and outdoor pursuits. We particularly seek to reach groups suffering deprivation or disability.

We would especially welcome to the Board people who share the ethos of the Centre and have experience and skills in the private sector, in finance, marketing or social media. The Board meets 6 to 8 times a year and all Board members also give time in some capacity between meetings. We were recently winners in the People’s Project Awards with our project Wellbeing at Wildside. You can see the film about the project at

https://www.thepeoplesprojects.org.uk/projects/view/wellbeing-at-wildside

Wildside Activity Centre, Hordern Road, Whitmore Reans WV6 0HA

01902 572240   http://www.wildsideac.co.uk/

 Charity number: 1059246 Company number: 03241721                             

 

If you are interested in membership of the Board, please contact Liz Hoggarth on 01902 572240 for a full information pack, or email lizh@wildsideac.co.uk. If you would like an informal discussion about the role, please contact Liz on the number above. There is no closing date and applications are welcome at any time.

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DISE funds start-up grants for community enterprises in Solihull

New community enterprises in Solihull can get a boost with grants of up to £500 from the Social Enterprise Development Foundation CIO backed by Development in Social Enterprise (DISE).

Individuals and informal groups with business ideas that will help their local community can apply to receive a package of support which includes a grant, business consultancy and training to give them the best possible start.

It is hoped the initiative will help to stimulate a new wave of community businesses in Solihull, similar to Chelmund’s Fish and Chips, which caught the headlines when it opened as Britain’s first community chip shop earlier this year.

The start-up fund has been made possible by DISE, which donates its profits to the Social Enterprise Development Foundation to help community groups grow their ideas.

David Lane, MD of DISE said:

“We’re pleased to be able to offer community members and groups small grants to stimulate their ideas and get their community businesses going, as many early stage organisations find it hard to find funding to get their ideas off the ground.”

The grant complements Solihull’s Community Enterprise for Success programme, which offers two days business support to social sector organisations, enabling beneficiaries to get the best possible start.

The grant can be used to cover expenses such as business registration, travel, marketing and event costs.

Applicants are invited to complete an expression of interest form by 9am on 22 October, outlining their plans and how the fund could assist them.

Download an application pack and check eligibility here 

Notes

The Social Enterprise Development Foundation is a Charitable Incorporated Organisation (CIO No 1162437). It was set up in 2015 to:

  • Provide incubator and hub spaces for enterprises
  • Provide enterprise development support, advice and guidance
  • Provide small organisations and start up enterprises with development grants.

For more information visit http://sedf-cio.org.uk

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Chelmsley Wood gets its chips

Chelmund’s Fish and Chips –  Chelmsley Wood gets its chips

A community owned chip shop? When you say it, it seems an obvious idea! Chelmsley Wood, in north Solihull, is about to have what they believe to be the country’s first community owned chippy.

It all started a couple of years ago when four local organisations saw an opportunity to benefit the local economy on every level. ‘We saw new shop units going up as part of Solihull MBC regeneration program,’ says Neil Roberts from Chelmsley Wood Baptist Church, one of the partners, ‘and we though, someone will put a chippy in there, why not us? We talked with Central England Co-Op who were building the units and they were supportive of the idea and asked us to submit a proposal.’

What followed was two years of planning, negotiating and a few sleepless nights. Four local organisations formed a social enterprise to manage the new business. These were the local churches (St Andrew’s and Chelmsley Wood Baptist), Development in Social Enterprise (a local social enterprise consultancy firm), Olive Branch Kitchen (a community café) and Three Trees Community Centre. Alan Crawford, manager at Three Trees continues, ‘The four partners brought the skills required, community development, business planning and catering, and formed the dream team for a community owned business.’

The partners emphasise that the chippy is a business, not a charitable project. ‘The only difference between us and the next business along is that a social enterprise is set up to reinvest its profit back into its community’, explains Dave Lane. ‘It is a business model, but the profits are locked in to guarantee community benefit.’ There is an emphasis on employing local people and using local supplies wherever possible, as well as the extra benefits to the local economy as money stays in the community rather than going to distant shareholders or centralised national offices.

So what is the plan? The shop, called Chelmund’s Fish and Chips, opens for business on Thursday 1st March. ‘People aren’t camping outside yet,’ jokes Mitchell Sherriff, the new manager, ‘but I wouldn’t be surprised given the number of people saying how long they’ve been waiting a chippy!’. Once the shop is operational, after overheads, any profits will be reinvested back into the community. Mike Harmon, the local Anglican vicar, says, ‘the money belongs to the community, we’ll use it to support local projects and events, and in the longer term we’ll be looking to start new businesses up and offer even more employment and opportunity.’

Come along and try us out!

Chelmund’s Fish & Chips, 856 Chester Road, Chelmund’s Cross, B37 7WG

Twitter @chelmundschippy

Facebook      facebook.com/ChelmundsChippy/

 

The partners:

Chelmsley Wood Baptist Church             www.cwbaptistchurch.com/

Three Trees                                                   www.3trees.org.uk/

St Andrew’s                                                  www.standrewschelmsleywood.co.uk/

Development in Social Enterprise           http://disecic.org/

Olive Branch Kitchen                                  just turn up and have a chat!

 

For background to the council regeneration program visit http://www.northsolihull.co.uk/village-centres

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Charitable Company to CIO

A quick post to let you know that charitable companies are now [Jan 2018] finally able to simply covert to a CIO.

For those who are new to this a CIO is a Charitable Incorporated Organisation which essentially means it’s a charity and a limited liability structure all in one and is regulated by the Charity Commission.

Until the CIO structure was introduced (about 5 years ago) charities that needed to limit liabilities needed to register a limited company (by guarantee) in addition to the charity registration. This means essentially they report to two regulatory bodies (Charity Commission) and (Companies House).

Since the introduction of the CIO structure there have been a number of new charities opting for the CIO structure with over 13,000 CIO’s registered at the time of writing, so it would seem to be a popular choice.

Indeed many older charities (with the dual structure noted above) have been considering converting to a CIO and have been eagerly awaiting the simple conversion which is now possible.

Don’t get too excited all at once though if you are reading this and have an income of over £12,500. The simple process is to be staged in a similar way to the introduction of the CIO. The staging announced is:

Date Annual income £
1 Jan 2018  less than 12,500
1 Mar 2018 12,500 – 25,000
1 May 2018 25,000 – 100,000
1 Jun 2018 100,000 – 250,000
1 Jul 2018 250,000 – 500,000
1 Aug 2018 More than 500,000

 

Further info https://www.gov.uk/guidance/change-your-charity-structure#convert-a-charitable-company-to-a-cio

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To Trustee or Not to Trustee

Have you conisdered becoming a Trustee or a Non Executive Director?

If you have we know charities (and social enterprises) that may value your help and support! Get in touch. 0121 667 6810 – info@disecic.org

If you haven’t then have a quick read below and see if you may be interested.

There are many benefits to becoming a trustee or non executive director of a charity or social enterprise, apart from helping a good cause in a leaderhsip role you may also:

  • Develop and refine your skills at a strategic level
  • Enhance your CV
  • Put your skills to good use and learn new skills
  • Support a cause that is close to your heart or that of someone close to you
  • Meet new and interesting people from all walks of life

If you are employed by a large company or public sector organisation then they may well have a corporate volunteer policy that could mean paid release whilst undertaking trustee duties so it may be easier than you think.

If you are unemployed then you may be able to develop your skills and enhance your CV.

All trustees and non executive directors are unpaid (volunteer) positions, but you will not be out of pocket, all exxpenses can be claimed.

Charities are looking for all sorts of skilled people to support them on their boards, but we’ve noted a particualr shortfall in:

  • People with commercial enterprise skills,
  • Business planning and monitoring,
  • Legal and para legal,
  • Marketing and Communications,
  • Accountancy,
  • Property management
  • Information and Coomunication Technology.

So if you want to make a difference then please do get in touch and we’ll help match you with a goood cause. 0121 667 6810 info@disecic.org

 

 

 

 

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2017 Social Enterprise Survey is live

Social Enterprise UK’s bi- annual (2017) survey is open. If you are a social enterprise we want to encourage you to take part, see below for further information.

As a social enterprise development organisation working throughout the Midlands (a further at times) we are keen supporters of the sector and the development of the social enterprise economy. Much of our work and support programmes are based on key data and information about the sector.

We therefore want to highlight to our clients, friends and visitors that the national bi-annual survey undertaken by Social Enterprise UK is now open and we’d like to encourage all social enterprises big or small to take part.

You can read previous reports by visiting SEUK’s site here.

You can go to the live survey by going here

Thanks it will really help the sector to have up-to-date- quality information on it’s current position.

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Thinking of Starting a Social Enterprise?

School for Social Entrepreneurs (Midlands) open for applications!

If you’re thinking or starting a social enterprise then look no further. Our friends over at the School for Social Entrepreneurs (Midlands) are recruiting for their next cohort now. If you’re successful you get onto one of the best action learning programmes currently available for social entrepreneurs and we may even see you at one of the sessions.

Here’s a taste of what’s on offer and how to find out more!

The School for Social Entrepreneurs in the Midlands will support 40 social entrepreneurs through the Lloyds Bank Social Entrepreneurs Start Up Programme 2017 supported by Big Lottery Fund.

The programme provides free support for a year:

  • A grant of up to £3,000
  • A learning programme comprising 15 days over 12 months
  • Mentoring
  • A community of people starting up social and environmental projects

Find out more by attending one of their 2 hour Information events:

  • Leicester – 23 March from 5:30pm – Book here 
  • Coventry – 28 March from 6:00pm – Book here
  • Birmingham #1 – 30 March from 5:30pm – Book here
  • Nottingham – 6th April from 5:30pm – Book here
  • Birmingham #2 – 11th April from 5:30pm – Book here
  • Wolverhampton – 12th April from 6:30pm – Book here

The deadline for applications is 26 April 2017.

“The SSE Midlands Start Up Programme is part of a UK-wide programme that will support 300 social entrepreneurs for a year.  This is the sixth year of this programme, and 99% of our students would recommend our programme.”
 

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GBSLEP Board Recruitment

Greater Birmingham calls for young person to join LEP Board

  • Greater Birmingham and Solihull Local Enterprise Partnership to appoint new ‘young’ Non-Executive Director
  • Appointment to be voice of young people in the area

Last week the Greater Birmingham and Solihull Local Enterprise Partnership (GBSLEP) opened applications for a new Non-Executive Director (NED) that will represent and inspire young people across the region.

The GBSLEP is the first LEP in the UK to create a youth representative role on its Board, reflecting the area’s uniquely youthful profile. Birmingham is one of the youngest and most diverse cities in Europe – 40% of its population are aged under 25. Across the wider region, 38% of the population are aged between 18 – 30.

The GBSLEP is looking for a confident, enthusiastic self-starter aged 18-30 with a passion for the region and its growth. The new Director will play a key role in driving forward the LEP’s ambitious Strategic Economic Plan across its three ‘Pillars’ of Business, People and Place.

The voluntary three-year role, will take up two to three days a month and, alongside Board duties the appointed young person will help to design and deliver the approach for recruiting young people to sit on each of the LEP’s sub-boards.

The successful individual will join 19 other Non-Executive Directors on the LEP Board from across the private, public and educational sectors, and will lead on representing the views of young people across every aspect of the LEP’s agenda.

This opportunity comes at an exciting time for Greater Birmingham and the GBSLEP. Key indicators such as job creation, economic output, foreign direct investment and business start-ups show that the region’s economy is growing.

Download the candidate brief – candidate-brief-gbslep-ned-for-young-people-final

If you would like more information on the role please contact: gbslep@birmingham.gov.uk.

 

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GBSLEP Consultation on their Strategic Economic Plan 2016-2030 Open

As a business support organisation specialising in supporting Social Enterprises to develop and grow and being based in the west Midlands Combined Authority (WMCA) area we have been interested in the developments of the Greater Birmingham and Solihull Local Enterprise Partnership (GBSLEP) for some time.

Many of you will have noticed recently that its growth hub website is now reasonably well populated and growth funding is available for business in the area (not social enterprises – likely because there are a number of specialised social enterprise development funds around) to scale up and grow.  So things are starting to move along.

However, we noted today that the GBSLEP Strategic Economic Plan (SEP) 2016-2030 (draft consultation version) “A greater Birmingham for a Greater Britain” is now published and the GBSLEP are interested in your comments on the plan. So we thought at the very least you’d want to read it and if you have comments please do send it through either by email or post to:

Comments on the SEP and our approach are welcomed by email and by post before the consultation closes on Friday 9th September 2016.

gbslep@birmingham.gov.uk SEP Consultation
GBSLEP Executive
Ground Floor, Baskerville House
Centenary Square, Broad Street
Birmingham B1 2ND

 

 

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Solihull’s VCSE is Ready for Success

R4SDirectoryVCSE organisations working in Solihull are celebrating their achievements on Development in Social Enterprise’s Ready for Success project. The project followed our successful Community Enterprise for Success programmes of support for local VCSE organisations and has been funded by Solihull Metropolitan Borough Council’s transformation directorate.

The Ready for Success project is part of “Solihull Together for Better Lives” which aims to transform social care and health services to increase choice, control and independence by ensuring health and social care services meet current and future needs. 23 organisations took part in the bespoke programme of support designed to ensure organisations were prepared for future commissioning and procurement of services (tender ready).

In March 2016 organisations attended and awards ceremony to recognise their achievements and saw the formal launch of the Health and Wellbeing Networking Directory. Karen Murphy, Assistant Director, Public Health and Commissioning thanked the group for engaging with the six month business development programme. Karen continued “We know that the process of commissioning and procurement can cause anxiety for smaller local organisations, and not be a pleasant experience if ill prepared. Procurement practices have traditionally tended to favour big organisations and we hope programmes like this will go some way towards levelling the playing field. We are committed to investing in our local providers and this piece of work has flagged up learning for us too, things we can do better. Above all, we see you as our partners and thank you for the work you do.”

David Lane, Chief Executive at Development in Social Enterprise said: “Since last October we have worked closely with organisations delivering a wide range of services including advice and guidance, advocacy, mental health, recovery support, and therapeutic indoor and outdoor activities. There was a genuine desire amongst the group to identify and address development areas, explore business opportunities and build relationships with one another for the benefit of service users.”

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